Motor vehicle accidents on Quebec roads in 2017 resulted in many deaths and serious injuries. The 2017 figures are an indication that it is becoming more and more difficult to improve the road safety record, which undoubtedly has an impact on first-time car insurance.

How Montreal Compares to the Rest of Quebec

In 2017, there was an increase in the number of deaths from accidents on Quebec roads. The transport minister André Fortin and Société de l’assurance automobile du Quebec chairperson Nathalie Tremblay availed to the public a report. Even though there was a drop in the number of accidents from 2016, there was an increase in the number of deaths. Out of 28, 109 accidents, there were 359 deaths. 1,501 people sustained serious injuries and 35, 330 got minor injuries. Young people ages 15-24 were the most affected. The death toll rose from 46 in 2016 to 75 in 2017.

It was reported that the leading cause of accidents is distraction. It accounted for 35% of the total accidents followed by drinking under the influence of alcohol at 26% and fatigue at 22%. According to the minister of transport, the government has put tight sanctions against using the phone while driving by increasing the fine to $300. For a second offence, the penalty is $600, and suspension of your driver’s license.

The Issues Impacting Montreal Roads

Keeping Young Drivers Safe

One in every five young people who were in a fatal road accident in 2017 got into the accident between midnight and 4 a.m. To deal with the problem changes have been made to the Highway Safety Code. Drivers with learner permits cannot drive between midnight and 5 a.m. Drivers of age 19 or lower can’t exceed a certain number of passengers of age 19 or younger. After this period, there are no restrictions. Those who defy these restrictions may get a penalty of $200 to $300.

Collisions With Pedestrians and Cyclists

In September, at least two people died and two others were injured in different road accidents. One of them was an 87-year old pedestrian. She was the 14th pedestrian to die in a road accident this year. The number of pedestrian deaths has increased from 63 in 2016 to 69 in 2017; the number increased by 25% from 2012 to 2016.

This increase may be attributed to pedestrians’ lack of respect for traffic rules, distraction, and failure to pay attention. In 2018, 15 pedestrians have died in road accidents on Montreal roads, four more than it was last year.

Furthermore, the number of cyclist deaths has increased due to failure to signal, using headphones when cycling, and ignoring red lights. The police are advertising regulations to be observed by pedestrians and cyclists and increasing their presence in significant areas. The number of motorcycle deaths fell by 9.3% in 2017, but serious injuries increased by 3%. The new regulations may help to reduce the accidents in Montreal in the coming years if they are implemented.

Get Insured

With the current trends we're seeing on Montreal roads, it is important to be prepared and get insured. Rates.ca lets you compare various insurance providers and select one that best suits you, including for first-time car insurance.

RATESDOTCA Team

The RATESDOTCA editorial team are experienced writers focused on sharing stories and bringing you the latest news in insurance and personal finance. Our goal is to provide Canadians with the information and resources they need to make better insurance and financial decisions.

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